Thursday, February 10, 2011

Dungeon Magazine Cover #187


This is my first whack at the world of D&D, it takes place in an underground necropolis that's infested by plague demons (those gents in the back). Thanks to Jon Schindehette for his great art direction and patience with my many, many questions.

16 comments:

  1. Holy crap-on-a-stick, Rahn. This is quite splendid. Love it.

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  2. Something just happened in my pants.

    Great piece.

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  3. Man... that lighting is awesome! I'd love to see a post on here about your process... did you shoot ref for it?
    Good stuff. I wish Dungeon Magazine was still a printed mag...

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  4. Wow this is spectacular. Everything just looks so INTENSE! It's great.

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  5. You sick, sick bastard. This is beautiful stuff, man. Love that light quality!

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  6. Great lighting. I love the glowing hand. Excellent job man!

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  7. Yep, choc-full of goodness. I love it!

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  8. Phenomenal and marvelous! Seriously, man. This is pretty amazing... I should probably get back to work.

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  9. Wow, this is a seriously killer piece.

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  10. Thanks guys!

    Vinod - oh yeah, I shot reference for the two humanoid characters and looked at a lot of photos of caves and ruins.

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  11. The colors, the lighting, the atmosphere, it's all amazing. An incredible illustration!

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  12. Really nice piece Chris :) I noticed most of your work seems to be traditional- how long does it take you to make a painting in oils? It seems like everyone paints digitally nowadays because its faster, I was wondering what your thoughts on that were.

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  13. George - Thanks. Yeah, a couple of years back I decided to drop the digital stuff all together. I really just prefer painting traditionally, and even if it's not as efficient I wind up selling a lot of my originals which more than makes up for it. Depending on the piece I usually spend between 3 and 5 days on a final painting, plus a day for sketching.

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